As a speaker, you bring your intellectual property to the event. Your presentation, whether it`s a keynote or a workshop, is your creation. As such, it`s important to protect your intellectual property by including a speaker agreement in your contract.

A speaker agreement is a written agreement between you and the event organizer that outlines the terms of your speaking engagement. It typically covers things like payment, travel arrangements, and speaking requirements. But more importantly, it also covers the use of your intellectual property.

Your intellectual property includes your presentation materials, your name and likeness, and any other materials that you create for the event. It`s important to protect your intellectual property because it`s your livelihood. If someone else uses your intellectual property without your permission, it can harm your reputation and your ability to earn income.

Here are some things to consider when drafting a speaker agreement for your intellectual property:

1. Copyright ownership: Generally, the copyright in your presentation materials belongs to you. However, it`s important to include a clause in your speaker agreement that confirms this. You should also include a clause that prohibits the event organizer from reproducing or distributing your presentation materials without your permission.

2. Use of your name and likeness: Your name and likeness are also your intellectual property. If the event organizer wants to use your name and likeness to promote the event, you should include a clause in your agreement that grants them permission to do so. However, you should also include a clause that limits this use to the promotion of the event and prohibits the event organizer from using your name and likeness for any other purpose without your permission.

3. Confidentiality: If you`re presenting sensitive or proprietary information, it`s important to include a confidentiality clause in your speaker agreement. This clause prohibits the event organizer from sharing your presentation materials with anyone outside of the event without your permission.

4. Limitations on use: You may want to include a clause in your speaker agreement that limits the use of your intellectual property by the event organizer. For example, you may want to prohibit the event organizer from using your presentation materials for any purpose other than the event.

5. Termination: It`s important to include a clause in your speaker agreement that allows you to terminate the agreement if the event organizer breaches any of the terms of the agreement. This clause should also include a provision for damages if the breach harms your reputation or ability to earn income.

In conclusion, protecting your intellectual property is important for your reputation and livelihood as a speaker. By including a speaker agreement in your contract, you can ensure that your intellectual property is used only with your permission and for the purposes that you specify. Consult with a lawyer if you need help drafting a speaker agreement that protects your intellectual property.